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Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. Some of these moves are illegal in some forms of traditional amateur wrestling because they can cause serious injury, especially in a competitive environment. They are sometimes also called "power moves", as they are meant to emphasize a wrestler's strength.

There is a wide variety of slams and throws in pro wrestling. Many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their "finisher" (signature moves that usually result in a win) new names that reflect their gimmick.

Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible. Template:Expand list

ArmbreakerEdit

An armbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams the opponent's arm against a part of the wrestler's body, usually a knee or shoulder. where a wrestler concentrates on the arm and drops a part of their body on to the arm.

Armbar takedownEdit

This variation of the armbreaker involves the attacking wrestler grabbing the opponent's left or right arm, holding it across their chest and then falling backwards, dropping the opponent face first as well as damaging the opponent's arm and shoulder. This move is also known as a single arm DDT.

Arm dragEdit

A move in which the wrestler uses his or her opponent's momentum to the opponent's disadvantage. The wrestler hooks the opponent's arm and flips him or her over onto the mat. The wrestler may roll on to his or her side to give the move extra momentum.

Japanese arm dragEdit

This move is performed when an opponent runs towards the wrestler facing him or her. When the opponent is in range, the wrestler hooks the opponent's near arm with both hands and falls backwards forcing the wrestler's own momentum to cause him or her to flip forwards over the head of the wrestler and onto his or her back.

Over the shoulder arm dragEdit

The wrestler grabs his or her opponent's arm, then turns to face the other direction and pulls the opponent over his or her shoulder. It is essentially the same as the ippon seoinage found in Judo.

Springboard arm dragEdit

An arm drag performed where the attacking wrestler grabs an opponent's arm, runs up the corner ring ropes and springboards, usually off the top rope, over the opponent. This drags the opponent by his or her arm to flip over onto the mat or on to the ropes.

Arm wringerEdit

An Arm Wringer or Spinning Wristlock is a move in which the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm by the wrist/arm and twists it over the wrestler's head to spin it around with enough force to take the opponent to the mat. The maneuver is a popular rest hold in American wrestling. Quite frequently the move is broken with an Irish Whip, reversed into a hammerlock, or countered with a reverse elbow or eye rake/gouge.

Atomic dropEdit

A move in which the wrestler goes behind an opponent puts his head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts his opponent up and then drops him or her tailbone-first on the wrestler's knee.

Inverted atomic dropEdit

A move in which the wrestler puts his or her head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts the opponent up and then drops him or her "lower abdomen region" or groin first on the wrestler's knee. It is called a Manhattan Drop in Japan, as named by Masahiro Chono. Even though this move is an indirect low blow, it is considered a legal move. Theoretically, it is the opponent's groin that has impacted with the wrestler's knee, not the other way around.

BackbreakerEdit

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A backbreaker is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops his/her opponent so that the opponent's back impacts or is bent backwards against a part of the wrestler's body.

Back body dropEdit

A back body drop or backdrop, is a move in which a wrestler bends forward or crouches in front of his/her opponent, grabs hold of his/her opponent, and stands up, lifting the opponent up and over and dropping him/her behind the back. It is applied frequently against a charging opponent.

In Japan, a backdrop is the term for what is called a belly-to-back suplex in America.

Mountain BombEdit

The opponent runs towards the wrestler. The wrestler ducks, hooks one of the opponent's legs with one of his arms, stands up and falls backwards, flipping the opponent and driving him back first down to the mat, with the wrestler landing on top of the opponent. Innovated and named by Hiroyoshi Tenzan.

Body slamEdit

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A body slam is any move in which a wrestler picks up his or her opponent and throws him or her down to the ground. When used by itself, the term body slam generally refers to a basic scoop slam.

Alabama slamEdit

Described as a double-leg slam, or flapjack spinebuster, this high-angle spinebuster variation involves a wrestler placing their head between an opponent's knees or under the opponent's arm, then standing up, holding onto their opponent's legs, so that the opponent is facing the wrestler's back. The wrestler then simply brings both hands down, throwing the opponent back-first to the mat. They may also hold the opponent in place while spinning in several circles before throwing the opponent down. The move has been known by the name Water-Wheel Slam and the Alabama Slam, named by Bob "Hardcore" Holly after his home state of Alabama.

Biel throwEdit

The wrestler stands to the side of their opponent, grabs them, and throws them forward, causing them to flip over onto their back. It is considered a very basic technique, so basic that a forward rolling fall is commonly called a biel bump, and is mainly used by very large wrestlers to emphasize power and strength over finesse.

ChokeslamEdit

Template:Main A chokeslam is any body slam in which the wrestler grasps their opponent's neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat, causing them to land on their back. Kane, Big Show and The Undertaker are most notable in using this move as finishers or as signature moves.

Cobra clutch slamEdit

In this slam a wrestler places the opponent in a cobra clutch and then lift the opponent into the air by their neck before jumping backwards, falling face down or into a sitting position, driving the opponent back first down to the mat.

Fireman's carry slamEdit

The wrestler first drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position. The wrestler then takes hold of the thigh and arm of the opponent, which are hung over the front side of the wrestler, and leans forward, pulling the opponent over their head and shoulders, slamming them down on their back in front of the wrestler.

A Rolling fireman's carry slam is a variation that sees the wrestler keep hold of the opponent and run forward before slamming the opponent to the ground, using the momentum to roll over the opponent. Mr. Kennedy has been known to perform a jumping variation from the second rope (and on occasion, the top rope), and calls it the Green Bay Plunge.

Fireman's carry takeoverEdit

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The wrestler kneels down on one knee and simultaneously grabs hold of one the opponent's thighs with one arm and one of the opponent's arms with his other arm. He then pulls the opponent on his shoulders and then rises up slightly, using the motion to push the opponent off his shoulders, flipping him to the mat onto his back. This is usually used as a transition move. It is also known as "kata-guruma", or "standing shoulder wheel" in Judo.

John Cena uses a standing variation of this move as one of his FU variations, where he stands up after lifting the opponent over his shoulders, then grabbing onto the right leg of the opponent and then flips them over and drops them down on their back while first tucking the opponents head into his abdomen. The second variation of the FU used by Cena is the technique of picking up 400-500 pounders, this sees him lifting up the opponent in the standard position and simply tilting them to one side, making the follow through easier, meaning that Cena can still land in the power slam position.

Fallaway slamEdit

Also known as a Table Top Suplex or the Last Call. The wrestler, while standing in front of an opponent would reach between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls backward throwing the opponent over their head down to the mat back-first. This slam can be either bridged into a pin, or the wrestler can float over into another fallaway slam. It can also be performed from the second turnbuckle, usually called a Super Fallaway Slam or Super Last Call. This move was popularized by the professional wrestler Scott Hall.

Full nelson slamEdit

In this move the aggressor places their opponent in a full nelson hold and uses it to lift them off the ground. Once in the air, the aggressor removes one of their arms (so their opponent is now in a half nelson) and slams them down to the mat. Another similar variation known as Double chickenwing slam sees the wrestler apply double chickenwing instead of a full nelson before slamming the opponent.

Sitout full nelson bombEdit

The wrestler places the opponent in a full nelson. The wrestler then lifts the opponent into the air, maintaining the hold. The wrestler then drops to a sitting position, driving the lower spine of the opponent into the ground.

Gorilla press slamEdit

This slam sees a wrestler first lift their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), before lowering the arm under the head of the opponent so that the opponent falls to that side, while flipping over and landing on his/her back. The attacking wrestler may repeatedly press the opponent overhead to show his strength, prior to dropping them.

In a variation of the move, the wrestler falls to a seated position, slamming the opponent down between their legs, in a fashion similar to that of the Michinoku Driver II. This is referred to as a Gorilla Press Driver. This also works for bigger wrestlers

Gorilla press dropEdit

The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended then drops the opponent down face-first in front or back. It is a popular technique for very large wrestlers because it emphasizes their height and power. This move is also called the Military Press Slam.

Half nelson slamEdit

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air to complete the half nelson. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, turns, and falls forward, slamming the opponent into the mat

Olympic slamEdit

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and grabs hold of one of the opponent's wrists, tucks his head under that arm's armpit, and wraps his free arm around the near leg of the opponent. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up on his shoulders sideways, and at the same time spins 90° and falls down on to his back, slamming the opponent down to the mat back first. The move can also be initiated from the front of an opponent. Following a knee to the stomach, the performer places his head under the opponent's armpit, and performs the same motions for that of initiating it from the rear of an opponent, once more spinning backwards 90° while falling to the mat[1]. Originally named and innovated by Kurt Angle, who later started calling it the Angle Slam. For Angle's stint on TNA, it was named back to Olympic Slam due to copyright issues.

Hirooki Goto uses a wrist-clutch variation called Goto Heaven. In this variation, instead of just wrapping his arm around the opponent’s leg, he grabs hold of the opponent's free arm, pulls it down from the front side between the opponent's legs, grabs hold of the wrist of that arm between the opponent's legs, and then performs the slam. Justice Pain uses an inverted arm-hook variation called the Pain Thriller.

Pumphandle dropEdit

Also known as a Tilt slam, the wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. The wrestler then lifts their opponent up until they are parallel with the wrestler's chest, then throws themselves forward, driving the back of the opponent into the ground with the weight of the wrestler atop them.

Pumphandle slamEdit

The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked (pumphandle). The attacking wrestler uses the hold to lift the opponent up over their shoulder, while over the shoulder the attacking wrestler would fall forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first, normally the type of powerslam delivered is a front powerslam. The move can also see other variations of a powerslam used, Snitsky is known to drop the opponent into a Sidewalk slam position and calls it the Massacre Slam; even though this version is usually referred to as a Pumphandle Side Slam.

Pumphandle Michinoku driver IIEdit

The wrestler lifts the opponent as with a pumphandle slam, but falls to a sitting position and drops the opponent between their legs as with a Michinoku Driver II.

Pumphandle fallaway slamEdit

Also known as the Tilt Suplex. The wrestler hooks up the opponent as a pumphandle slam, then the wrestler goes through the body movements for the fallaway slam, executing the release of the opponent as they enter the apex of the throw, instead of at or just past the apex of the throw like when one executes the fallaway slam. Usually the opponent then adds effort to gain extra rotations in the air for effect or to ensure that they do not take the bump on their side.

Samoan dropEdit

Technically known as a Fireman's carry drop; the wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position then falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat on their back. The move has been a signature move for Samoan wrestlers throughout the years. A Samoan drop is usually a counter to drop the opponents momentum.

Scoop slamEdit

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Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up and turns them upside down so that they are held up by the wrestler's arm cradling their back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground so that they land on their back. The opponent will often assist the slammer by placing their arm on the slammers thigh.

Side slamEdit

The wrestler stands face to face with the opponent, slightly to their side. The wrestler tucks his head under the opponent's near arm, reaches across the opponent's chest and around their neck with his near arm, and places his other arm against their back. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up and throws them forward while still standing to slam them down to the mat back first. This more common Powerslam Version sees the wrestler falls down to the mat with the opponent.

SpinebusterEdit

The wrestler starts by facing their opponent. They then grab the opponent around the waist and lift them up, turning 180°, and toss them forward onto their back or slam them down while landing on top of them. It is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the opponent's own momentum to make the throw more powerful. It is called a rolling spinebuster or spinning spinebuster in Japan. This version is generally associated with Arn Anderson and his name is often evoked whenever a wrestler performs it (Double-A Spinebuster, Anderson Spinebuster, etc.).

Another version, more commonly used by larger wrestlers sees the wrestler elevate the opponent up and drop down with them to the mat without spinning, slamming their opponent's back and giving them legitimate whiplash.

BrainbusterEdit

Template:Main A brainbuster, also known as an Avalanche Suplex, is a move in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was performing a vertical suplex. The wrestler then jumps up and falls onto his/her back so that the opponent lands on his/her head while remaining vertical.

BulldogEdit

A bulldog, originally known as bulldogging or a bulldogging headlock, is any move in which the wrestler grabs an opponent's head and jumps forward, so that the wrestler lands, often in a sitting position, and drives the opponent's face into the mat.[2] This move plus some other variations are sometimes referred to as a facebuster. It can also be used as a reversal to a powerbomb.

Cobra clutch bulldogEdit

The wrestler applies a Cobra Clutch and then leaps forward, falling into a sitting position and driving the face of the opponent into the ground.

Half nelson bulldogEdit

The wrestler hooks a half nelson hold on his opponent with one arm and his opponents waist with the other. He then leaps forward into a sitting position, driving the face of the opponent into the ground. This move is also incorrectly referred to as a faceplant, which is a different move altogether.

One-handed bulldogEdit

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The one-handed bulldog is in fact more of a facebuster than an actual bulldog and generally sees a wrestler run up from behind their opponent, grab the opponent's head with one hand and leap forward to drive this opponent's face into the mat.

A two-handed variation of this sees the attacking wrestler charge at the opponent and push, with both hands, down on the back of the opponent's head to force them face-first into the mat below.

Spinning bulldogEdit

The wrestler places the opponent in a modified fireman's carry in which the opponent is held diagonally across the wrestlers back with their legs across one shoulder and head under the opposite shoulder (usually held in place with a facelock). The wrestler then spins simultaneously throwing the opponent's legs off the wrestler's shoulders and dropping to the ground, driving the opponent's head into the mat in a bulldog position.

Reverse bulldogEdit

The attacking wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the opposite direction, from there he/she leaps in the air and drops to a seated position driving the opponent neck and back first to the mat. In another variation, the attacker runs to the opponent and executes the move. This is usually referred to a lariat takedown.

CutterEdit

Template:See also This variant is done from the front, using a three-quarters facelock, and has many derivative variants.

CatapultEdit

A Catapult or Slingshot Catapult is a throw that typically starts with the opponent on his/her back, and the wrestler standing and facing him. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of his/her arms then falls backwards to slingshot the opponent into a turnbuckle, ladder, rope, etc. This can also be held for a backbreaker.

DDTEdit

Template:Main Similar to a bulldog, a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive the opponent's head into the mat. The classic DDT is performed by putting the opponent in a front facelock and falling backwards so that the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his/her head.

Death Valley driverEdit

Often abbreviated to D.V.D. and known as a Death Valley Bomb in Japan. This is a move in which a brainbuster-type slam is performed from a fireman's carry. The wrestler falls in the direction that the opponent's head is facing, driving the opponent's head into the mat. This move was innovated by Etsuko Mita.

Louie Spicolli used the move as a finisher during his tenure in Extreme Championship Wrestling. Upon his death the move was unofficially renamed the Spicolli Driver by announcer Joey Styles, who would call the move by this name when any wrestler performed it in ECW, usually by Tommy Dreamer.

Sean O'Haire uses a variation in which he throws out his opponent on the opposite side. He calls this the Widow Maker or the Prophecy. Toby Klein does a version he calls the Insanity Driver, where he gets his opponent in position then he spins before slamming them (quite often onto a weapon of some sort).

Beth Phoenix uses a variation in which she and the opponent were on the second rope. The she lifts the opponent in the Fireman's carry position. She and the opponent would then descend to the mat, impacting the opponent's head.

Inverted Death Valley driverEdit

Invented by Kyoko Inoue and called the Victoria Driver. Also known as a Burning Hammer or inverted D.V.D. The move is executed from a Argentine backbreaker rack (face up, with the neck and one leg cradled) position. The wrestler falls sideways, driving the opponent's head to the mat. This is considered an extremely dangerous move as the opponent's body cannot roll with the natural momentum of the move to absorb the impact. It was popularized by Kenta Kobashi as the Burning Hammer.

A cut-throat variation of this driver was innovated by Mark Briscoe, which he named the Cut-Throat Driver, where instead of holding the body of the opponent he would hold the far arm of the opponent across the opponents own throat, and maintain it by holding the opponents wrist, before performing the inverted Death Valley driver.

Side Death Valley driverEdit

A variation between the regular Death Valley driver and the inverted one. The opponent lays on the shoulders of the wrestler on his side, facing either the opposite or the same direction as the wrestler, with the wrestler holding the opponent by the lower leg, and either the head or lower arm. The wrestler then falls sideways, driving the opponent down to the mat shoulder and neck first.

Kenta Kobashi has used a pumphandle variation known as the Burning Hammer II or the Wrist-Clutch Burning Hammer.

DriverEdit

A Driver is a variation of many moves that involves an opponent being driven down between the legs of a wrestler (who is dropping to a seated position) on the back of his/her neck/shoulder area.

Blue Thunder driverEdit

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Electric chair driverEdit

In this variation of a driver the wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sit out position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them usually resulting in a pin.

Fisherman driverEdit

The wrestler places the opponent in a front facelock and hooks one of the opponent's legs with his free arm. The wrestler then lifts the opponent upside down or onto his shoulders, and then sits down, driving the opponent between his legs, head and shoulder first.

A wrist-clutch variation of this driver exists which sees the wrestler lift the opponent onto their shoulders and while the opponent is on their shoulders they use the hand hooking the opponent's leg to reach upwards and clutch the wrist of the arm opposite the hooked leg. While maintaining the wrist-clutch they then perform the driver. There is a further variation that does not include the shoulder lift that sees the wrestler hook the leg and wrist while the opponent is standing in front of them, lift the opponent upside down and then fall to the sitout position.

Half nelson driverEdit

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and applies a half nelson hold on his opponent, placing one of his hands against the opponent's neck after hooking the opponent's arm with it. He the scoops the opponent's near leg with his other arm and lifts the opponent up, flips the opponent upside down, and then either kneels or sits down, driving the opponent down to the mat on their neck.

Michinoku driver IIEdit

Also known as a 'sitout body slam piledriver', but is named after its inventor TAKA Michinoku. While facing his/her opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the other side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and turns him/her upside down so that he/she is held up by the wrestler's arm cradling his/her back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground as he/she falls to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on his/her upper back. This is often simply called a Michinoku Driver because TAKA Michinoku rarely uses the original Michinoku Driver, a double underhook brainbuster.

Michinoku driver II-BEdit

TAKA Michinoku also invented a variation of the Michinoku Driver II in which the wrestler stands behind the opponent, applies an inverted facelock, lifts them upside down, and then drops down to a sitting position, driving the opponent down to the mat between the wrestler's legs upper back first.

Samoan driverEdit

This move is essentially a fireman's carry variation of a Michinoku Driver II. The attacking wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them. Chris Sabin uses a variation of the move called the Cradle Shock, where the opponent's legs are crossed during the move.

Tiger driverEdit

Invented by Mitsuharu Misawa. The wrestler faces a bent over opponent and double underhooks the opponent's arms. The wrestler then lifts them up, flips the opponent and drops the opponent on their back while falling to sitting position, often pinning the opponent in the process. This is also known as a 'sitout double underhook powerbomb'.

Jaguar Yokota innovated a variation in which the opponent is dropped on their neck and shoulders, rather than their back, and the wrestler drops to their knees. This variation is usually called the Tiger Driver '91, after the year in which Mitsuharu Misawa (who popularized the move) first performed it. It is also known as a kneeling spike double underhook powerbomb.

There is some dispute over the correct name because the move resembles a Powerbomb more than a driver - thus, the move is also sometimes referred to as a Tiger Bomb. However, Tiger Driver is the original and more commonly accepted name. Some consider a double underhook powerbomb where the wrestler does not sitout to be a Tiger Bomb, while the sit-out variant is considered the Tiger Driver.

Electric chair dropEdit

The wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then falls backwards driving the opponent back-first into the mat.

Manami Toyota innovated a cross-armed version which is bridged into a pin, calling it the Japanese Ocean Cyclone Suplex. Frankie Kazarian uses a wrist-lock variation of this move, also bridged into a pin, called Back to the Future.

Electric chair bombEdit

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FacebreakerEdit

A facebreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's face against a part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.

Facebreaker DDTEdit

The wrestler applies a front facelock and then falls backwards, much like a normal DDT, but instead of the opponent's head impacting the mat, the wrestler falls to a kneeling or sitting position driving the face of the opponent onto his/her knee.

Facebreaker knee smashEdit

The knee smash, also called a Coconuts crush, is a standard facebreaker which involves the wrestler facing an opponent and grabbing him or her by the head or hair and pulling the opponent's face down, dropping it on to the wrestler's knee. Often used by a wrestler to stun an opponent and set him or her up for another move.

Many other facebreakers use the knee to inflict the damage; one variation sees the wrestler apply a standing side headlock, and simultaneously pull the opponent forward and smash the wrestler's knee to the opponent's head. There is also a double knee variation.

Double knee facebreakerEdit

This facebreaker involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and then leaping to bring both knees up to the face of the opponent. The wrestler then falls backwards to the mat, thus forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees. CIMA and his Typhoon stablemates, most notably Susumu Yokosuka, use a double-team variation from a wheelbarrow position called the Superdrol. A single knee variation is also possible. Petey Williams uses a version where he slingshots off the ring apron into the ring and drives both knees into his opponents chest. Naomichi Marufuji has recently started using the maneuver, and after seeing him perform it at an ROH show, Chris Jericho adopted a running variation called the Codebreaker as his new finisher, usually preceded by his signature stance.

Hangman's facebreakerEdit

Also described as an over the shoulder facebreaker, this facebreaker is performed when an attacking wrestler, who is standing in a back-to-back position with an opponent, reaches back to pull the opponent's head over his/her shoulder before (while keeping a hold of the opponent's head) spinning round to twist the opponent's head over as they drop down to one knee forcing the opponent face-first into the wrestlers exposed knee in one quick fluid motion.

FacebusterEdit

Template:Main A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is any move in which the wrestler forces his/her opponent's face down to the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is either a DDT or bulldog variation. Also, inverted Mat Slams are commonly referred to as facebusters. A standard Facebuster also known as a Jumping facebuster involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and jumping down, forcing the opponent's face into the mat.

FlapjackEdit

A flapjack, also known as a Pancake slam, is any move that throws the opponent so that he/she is pushed upward and therefore having him/her fall on his/her front. In a basic flapjack, a wrestler pushes his opponent upward by reaching under his legs and lifting him into the air. While retaining the hold on the opponent's leg, the wrestler would fall backwards, dropping the opponent front-first into the canvas. It is commonly used by a wrestler when an opponent is charging towards him.

The move is similar to a back drop, but the wrestler pushes upwards so that the opponent falls onto his/her face instead of falling back-first.

A Hotshot is referred to when a flapjack is performed so that the opponent falls across the ring ropes. The fireman's carry flapjack sees the wrestler lift the opponent on to a fireman's carry, and then throw the upper body of the opponent away from the wrestler while the wrestler falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat chest first.

Alley OopEdit

Also known as a reverse powerbomb. The wrestler lifts the opponent so that they are seated on the wrestler’s shoulders, facing away from him, as in a powerbomb. The wrestler then falls backwards while throwing the opponent the same way, dropping them down to the mat on their chest. Tori used a variation of this maneuver where she wouldn't keep the opponent on her shoulders, but instead, she would do the maneuver very fast so it whipped the opponent.

Another variation of this is best called a Package powerbomb throw, or Steenalizer (The latter name coming from the most known user of this variation Kevin Steen). This version sees the wrestler pick the opponent up onto their shoulders in powerbomb position and dropping backwards while throwing the opponents so that the opponent flips forward and lands on their neck and upper back.

Giant swingEdit

A Giant swing starts with an opponent lying on the mat, face up, and the wrestler at the opponent's feet. The wrestler takes the opponent's legs up under his/her arms, similar to the setup for a catapult, but instead pivots, spinning around to lift the opponent off the mat. The attacking may release the opponent to send him/her flying, or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground.

Guillotine dropEdit

Innovated by Nikki Roxx, and dubbed the Barbie Crusher or Voodoo Drop for her Roxxi Laveaux gimmick, this move sees the attacking wrestler first applying a hammerlock, then lift the opponent in a standing guillotine choke and finally drop the opponent lower spine first to the mat. This eventually causes an effect to the whole spine and neck. Chris Hero uses a variation of the move where he applies a cravate instead of a guillotine choke. He calls the move Cravate Countdown.

GutbusterEdit

A Gutbuster is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops him/her so that the opponent's stomach impacts against part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee. A basic gutbuster is often called a stomach breaker and is essentially the same as a backbreaker but with the opponent facing the opposite direction. This similarity with backbreakers is reflected in almost every gutbuster variation, which if inverted would become backbreakers and visa versa.

Double knee gutbusterEdit

This gutbuster involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and leaping to bring both knees up to the stomach of the opponent; the wrestler will then fall backwards, forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees.

Elevated gutbuster Edit

This variation of a gutbuster sees an opponent first elevated into a high lifting transition hold before being dropped down for a gutbuster.

Fireman's carry gutbuster Edit

This is the most common version of the elevated gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler first lift the opponent up across their shoulders; a position known as a "fireman's carry", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee.

A slight variation of this, innovated by Roderick Strong, uses a modified double knee gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler drop down to their back while bringing both knees up for the opponent to land on. This variation is also used as a finisher by Jamie Noble.

Gorilla press gutbuster Edit

This version of the elevated gutbuster first sees the attacking wrestler lift an opponent over their head with their arms fully extended; a position known as a "Gorilla press", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee.

Gutbuster dropEdit

An elevated gutbuster in which an attacking wrestler would lift an opponent up, stomach-first, across one of their shoulders before dropping down to their knees forcing the opponent's stomach to impact on the wrestler's shoulder.

Rib breakerEdit

A rib breaker is a version of a gutbuster that involves the wrestler scooping the opponent up by reaching between the legs of the opponent with one arm and reaching around their back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler then lifts his/her opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler’s body. From here the wrestler drops down to one knee, forcing the opponent to drop stomach/rib-first against the wrestler's raised knee.

Headscissors takedownEdit

The move can be performed two ways, with the wrestler facing up or down. With the wrestler's legs scissored around the opponent's head, and if the wrestler is facing up, he performs a backflip, dragging the opponent into a forced somersault that throws the opponent away and on to their back. If the wrestler is facing down, he bends forward instead of performing a backflip. Of the two variations the facing down version is more often referred to as a Headscissors takedown with the facing up version being referred to as a Frankensteiner or Hurricanrana.

A variation where the wrestler forces the opponent to spin before releasing him is referred to as a Satellite (spinning) headscissors. Another variation when the attacking wrestler rotates numerous times around the opponent before performing the head scissors is known as Déjà Vu as named by Dragon Kid.

FrankensteinerEdit

This move is commonly referred to as a huracanrana or hurricanrana, although it is technically slightly different. The move is described as a headscissors takedown that is performed against a running opponent. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of the charging opponent and performs a backflip, using his momentum to throw the opponent over him and on to their back.[3]

It was named "Frankensteiner" by Scott Steiner, who used it as a finishing move.[4] The move also has a variation where the opponent is sitting on the top rope, that variation is also referred to as frankensteiner. Another variation of the Frankensteiner sees a grounded wrestler first "kip-up" on to a standing opponent's shoulders, this is where a wrestler roll onto the back of his/her shoulders bringing his/her legs up and kicking forward to build momentum to lift themselves off the floor and on to the standing opponent. This is often referred to as a kip-up hurricanrana, though technically it's a frankensteiner.

Reverse frankensteinerEdit

Also known as an Inverted Frankensteiner or Poison Rana, this move is similar to a standard frankensteiner. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent and performs a backflip, using the momentum to throw the opponent over. However, in this version a wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent from behind, so that they are facing the same way as the opponent. By leaning backwards the wrestler attempts to perform a backflip and throw the opponent over on their belly. Due to the difficulty in performing a backflip with the extra weight often the ending of this move sees the opponent's head stuck between the legs of the wrestler hitting the mat first; giving it a resemblance to a back-to-back flip piledriver.

This move is dangerous in that the attacking wrestler cannot let go of the head scissors because the opponent has no natural momentum with the move so most of the time the opponent lands on their head between the legs of the wrestler, and if the opponent doesn't aid the backflip enough the wrestler can end up being crushed by the opponent landing on their back.

HurricanranaEdit

The correct name for this maneuver is the Huracanrana, but it is commonly misspelled in English as Hurricanrana and was invented by Luchador Huracan Ramirez. This is a Frankensteiner headscissors takedown that ends in a rana pinning hold. The rana is any double-leg cradle. The huracanrana is typically done with more velocity than the headscissors takedown, as the opponent needs to land directly underneath the wrestler, instead of being tossed away.[5]

It is often confused with the more impactful non-pinning headscissor variation known as a Frankensteiner, although the difference is similar to seeing a bridged suplex compared to a released one.

Hip tossEdit

The wrestler stands next to the opponent with both facing the same direction, and the wrestler hooks their closest arm underneath and behind the opponent's closest armpit. The wrestler then quickly lifts the opponent up with that arm and throws them forward, which would lead the wrestler to flip the opponent onto their back to end the move.

Mideon used a variation of this move in which the wrestler first puts the opponent into a pumphandle setup and then flips the opponent over on their back.

IconoclasmEdit

This top rope flipping slam sees a wrestler stand under an opponent, who is situated on the top turnbuckle, turn his/her back to this opponent while taking hold of the opponent's arms from below, often holding underneath the opponent's arm pits. The wrestler would then throw the opponent forward while falling to a seated position, flipping the opponent over in midair, and slamming them down to the mat back first. The Iconoclasm was popularized and named by Dragon Gate wrestler, CIMA.[6][7] There is also a cross armed variation, dubbed the goriconoclasm by CIMA.

Christopher Daniels uses a variation, which he calls the Fall From Grace, in which Daniels wraps one of the opponent's arms around their own neck and throws them down by the wrapped arm.

Irish whipEdit

File:Snitsky-Irish-Whips-Kendrick,-RLA-Melb-10.11.2007.jpg

Also called a hammer throw. A move in which the wrestler grabs one of his/her opponent's arms and spins, swinging the opponent into an obstacle such as the ring ropes, a turnbuckle, or the stairs leading into the ring.

An Irish whip into the ring ropes is usually used to set the opponent up for another technique as he/she bounces off, such as a back body drop, clothesline or sleeper hold. An Irish whip into the turnbuckles usually sees the opponent remain in the corner, allowing a follow-up attack from the wrestler, such as a corner clothesline, avalanche, Stinger splash, or a running knee; the opponent may remain standing or slump to the ground, usually in a seated position, which will vary the attack. One occasional use of the Irish whip is to try to "hit for the cycle" by whipping one's opponent into each corner in turn.

JawbreakerEdit

A jawbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's jaw against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder.

Sitout jawbreakerEdit

Jeff Hardy does this as he pulls his opponents jaw on top of his head and lands in a sitting position. He does this when his opponent is about to pick him up. A standard jawbreaker is seen when a wrestler (either stands facing or not facing opponent) places his/her head under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into the top of his/her head. Sometimes it is also used to counter a headlock by the opponent.

Shoulder jawbreakerEdit

The wrestler stands facing the opponent, places his/her shoulder under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into his/her shoulder.

StunnerEdit

Template:Main A Stunner is a sitout three-quarter facelock jawbreaker. It involves an attacking wrestler applying a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above the wrestler's shoulder) before falling to a seated position and forcing the defender's jaw to drop down on the shoulder of the attacking wrestler. It is the finishing move used by Stone Cold Steve Austin. The original user of the move was Mikey Whipwreck.

Mat slamEdit

A mat slam is any move in which the wrestler forces the back of the opponent's head into the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is considered a type of DDT (if the wrestler falls backwards) or bulldog. A standard Mat Slam involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and pulling back, forcing the back of the opponent's head into the mat.

Double underhook mat slamEdit

The wrestler faces an opponent, overhooks both arms, and then pivots 180º so that the opponent is facing upwards with his or her head pressed against the upper back--or under an arm--of the wrestler. The wrestler then drops down to his/her back, driving the back of the opponent's head and neck into the mat.

Sitout rear mat slamEdit

The wrestler takes hold of their opponent from behind, holding them by either their hair or the top of their head. The wrestler then jumps backwards and falls to a sitting position, driving the back of the opponent's head into the ground between their legs. Edge calls his version the Edge-O-Matic and X-Pac calls his version the X-O-Matic.

A variation sees the wrestler run up the corner turnbuckles, perform a backflip over a chasing opponent, and at the same time grab hold of the opponents head and perform the slam. In another variation the wrestler could put the opponent in a straight jacket hold before dropping him/her in a sitout position.Talia Madison calls this move the Re-TALIA-Tion.

Sleeper slamEdit

This slamming version of a headlock takedown sees a wrestler apply a sleeper hold to the opponent, then falls face first to the ground, pulling the opponent down with them and driving the back and head of the opponent into the ground. Chris Jericho popularized this move and calls it the Flashback. Another version Jericho popularized involves catching the head of a charging opponent, swinging around them to pull them down to the mat. A similar variation is used by Masato Yoshino and Hiroshi Tanahashi, named the Sling Blade, in which he runs towards an opponent, catches their head, swings around them and pulls their head down to the mat with him.

Tilt-a-whirl mat slamEdit

As the name suggests the wrestler would first use a tilt-a-whirl to raise the opponent into a belly-to-belly (piledriver) position, from here the wrestler would fall forward planting the opponent into the mat back-first. This is also called Tilt-a-whirl slam.

The move is sometimes named by fans and independent commentators as an "Inverted Styles Clash" in reference to a belly-to-back version. Though not often used by many wrestlers, this mat slam does happen as a result of other botched (poorly executed) moves. When a wrestler is lifted for a standard tilt-a-whirl slam they can often be positioned wrong a land in this fashion, also when wrestlers are performing tombstone piledriver if the weight isn't properly distributed the attacking wrestler can fall forward instead of straight down; hitting a mat slam rather than the piledriver they are attempting.

Monkey flipEdit

This move, often referred to as a Monkey climb in British wrestling, involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head before then bringing up both legs so that they place their feet on the hips/waist of the opponent; making the head hold and the wrestlers' sense of balance are the only things allowing both wrestler to be in an upright position. At this point, the attacking wrestler would shift their weight so that they fall backwards to the mat while forcing the opponent to fall forwards with them only to have the attacking wrestler push up with their legs forcing the opponent to flip forwards, over the wrestler's head, onto their back. This move is most commonly performed out of a ring corner. This is due to it being easier to climb onto an opponent while in the corner as balance is easily retained, and it allows the maximum length of ring to propel the opponent across.

Muscle BusterEdit

The move is performed when an attacking wrestler hooks both an opponent's legs with his/her arms and tucks their head in next to the opponent's before standing and lifting the opponent up, so that they are upside down with their head resting on the attacking wrestler's shoulder. From this position, the attacking wrestler jumps up and drops down to the mat, driving the opponent shoulder first down to the mat with the opponent's neck impacting both the wrestler's shoulder and the mat.

This can see the wrestler pick up an opponent who is standing but bent forward but it often begins with an opponent who is sitting on an elevated position, usually a top turnbuckle, because it's easier to hook and lift an opponent when they are positioned higher than the wrestler. Samoa Joe is noted for often using an Avalanche Muscle Buster, where he falls to the mat from a raised platform, usually the second rope. The move also has a neckbreaker variation which focuses more of the attack on the opponent's neck.

NeckbreakerEdit

Template:Main There are two general categories of neckbreaker, which are related only in that they attack the opponent's neck. One category of neckbreaker is the type of move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's neck against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder. A neckbreaker slam is another technique in which the wrestler throws his/her opponent to the ground by twisting the opponent's neck. also a back head slam or, when a wrestler drops to the mat while holding an opponent by their neck, without having to twist it.

PiledriverEdit

Template:Main

A Piledriver is any move in which the wrestler grabs their opponent, turns them upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponent's head into the mat. Other variations focus the attack on the neck, rather than the head.

PowerbombEdit

Template:Main A powerbomb is a move in which an opponent is lifted up into the air and then slammed down back-first to the mat.[8] The standard Powerbomb sees the opponent placed in a standing headscissors position (bent forward with their head placed between the wrestler's thighs), lifted up on the wrestler's shoulders, and slammed back-first down to the mat.

PowerslamEdit

Template:Main A powerslam is any slam in which the wrestler performing the technique falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam and the scoop powerslam.

Shin breakerEdit

The wrestler faces the opponent from the side, slightly behind. He tucks his head under the opponent's near armpit, and grabs hold of the opponent's near leg, bending it fully. He then lifts the opponent up and slams him downwards, impacting the opponent's bent leg on one of the wrestler's knee. This move is used to weaken the leg for a submission maneuver. Such uses include Ric Flair using a shin breaker to set up for his Figure four leglock.

ShoulderbreakerEdit

A shoulderbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's shoulder against any part of the wrestler's body, usually the shin or knee. This move is normally used to weaken the arm for a submission maneuver or to make it more difficult for the opponent to kick out of a possible pinfall attempt. The most common version sees the wrestler turn the opponent upside-down and drop the opponent shoulder-first on the wrestler's knee. Usually the opponent is held over the wrestler's shoulder in either a powerslam position, or less commonly an inverted powerslam position for what is sometimes called the Reverse Shoulderbreaker.

Snake EyesEdit

This move sees the wrestler place the opponent stomach down on his or her shoulder such that they both are facing the same direction. The wrestler then throws the opponent face-first onto any top turnbuckle or throat-first on any top rope of the ring. The move was made popular by Kevin Nash during his early 90's WCW gimmick of Vinnie Vegas and by the Undertaker in the WWE, usually followed by a Big Boot.

SnapmareEdit

With the wrestler's back to the opponent, he/she applies a three-quarter facelock or cravate, kneels down, and then pulls the opponent forward, flipping them over his/her shoulder down to the mat, back first. Another variation sees the wrestler hold the opponent by the hair instead of putting them in a three quarters facelock before slamming them to the mat. This is often used as a transition to a submission hold, usually a grounded sleeper.

Snapmare driverEdit

A high impact variation of the snapmare where instead of flipping the opponent over, the wrestler drops down either on their chest or down on their knees and drives the opponent's head down to the mat forehead first, with the three quarters facelock.

SuplexEdit

Template:Main A suplex is the same as the amateur suplex, a throw which involves arching/bridging either overhead or twisting to the side, so the opponent is slammed to the mat back-first. The term suplex (without qualifiers) can also refer specifically to the vertical suplex.

Spinning crucifix tossEdit

Sergei lifts the opponent above his back with the opponent's arm spread out in a crucifix hold, spins around, pushes the opponent up, and moves out of the way, dropping the opponent down to the mat. TNA wrestler James Storm performs this move, calling it the Eye of the Storm.

Trips and sweepsEdit

Double leg takedownEdit

Template:See also A tackle where the intention is to force the opponent down on their back by tackling them at their waist or upper thighs. This usually involves grabbing the opponent with both arms around the opponent's legs while keeping the chest close to the opponent, and using this position to force the opponent to the ground.

Dragon screw legwhipEdit

This is a legwhip where a wrestler grabs an opponent's leg and holds it parallel to the mat while they are facing each other. The attacking wrestler then spins the leg inwards causing the opponent to fall off balance and twist in the air bringing them to the ground in a turning motion. Popularized by Tatsumi Fujinami who gave the move its name.

Mandala hineriEdit

Also referred to as Mandara Twist, this is a variant of the dragon screw where the wrestler spins to the outside, causing leg damage and causing their opponent to go airborne.

Drop toe-holdEdit

The wrestler falls to the ground, placing one foot at the front of the opponent's ankle and the other in the back of the shin. This causes the opponent to fall face first into the ground. It is sometimes used illegally to force an opponent into a chair or other elevated weapon; it is also used occasionally to force an opponent face-first into the turnbuckles, stunning him/her or her momentarily. Technical wrestlers may use it as a quick transitional move into a grounded submission hold. Also referred to as a Scissor Sweep. Raven uses this move to trip opponents head-first to an upright chair.

Half nelson legsweepEdit

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with his/her corresponding arm and places the palm of his/her hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air (the Half Nelson). The wrestler then uses his/her other arm to pull the opponent's other arm behind the opponent's head, so both opponent's arms are pinned. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg and throws themselves backwards, driving the opponent back-first to the ground.

Russian legsweepEdit

Also known as a Side Russian legsweep. A move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the opponent's back to hook the opponent's head with the other hand extending the opponent's nearest arm, then while hooking the opponent's leg the wrestler falls backward, pulling the opponent to the mat back-first.

The Sandman uses a variation in which he holds a kendo stick across his opponent's throat, he calls it the White Russian Legsweep. There is also a facebuster variation of this move, noted to have been used by Jeff Jarrett, who called it the Stroke.

Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep Edit

The wrestler stands in front of, facing away from and slightly to one side of the opponent. The wrestler then reaches behind themselves and applies a three-quarter facelock to the opponent. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg with their own near leg and sweeps the leg away, simultaneously throwing themselves backwards, thus driving the opponent to the ground (with the weight of the wrestler on top of them) and wrenching the opponent's neck.

SchoolboyEdit

This technique gives its name to the schoolboy bump and is performed when the wrestler drops down to his (schoolboy)/her (schoolgirl) knees behind the opponent and forces his/her bodyweight forward to trip the opponent over the attacking wrestler so that they fall flat on their back. The name schoolboy also refers to a roll-up pin.

STOEdit

STO (Space Tornado Ogawa) is a sweep in which a wrestler wraps one arm across the chest of his/her opponent and sweeps the opponent's leg with his/her own leg to slam the other wrestler back-first. This can also be a lariat-legsweep combination to slam down opponent. Same as the judo sweep O-soto-gari. Naoya Ogawa, a former Olympic judoka, adapted the move into pro wrestling.

Clawhold STOEdit

Also known as an STK (Space Tornado Kensuke) as named by Kensuke Sasaki. This move is an STO where the wrestler would first apply a clawhold with one hand before sweeping his/her opponent's leg.

Reverse STOEdit

Template:See also This is a move where a wrestler locks one of his opponents leg and then the neck.

Set up moveEdit

Template:Main These are transition moves that set up for various throws and slams.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Template:Reflist

External linksEdit

Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. There are a wide variety of attacking moves in pro wrestling, and many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their finishers new names. Occasionally, these names become popular and are used regardless of the wrestler performing the technique.

Professional wrestling contains a variety of punches and kicks found in martial arts and other fighting sports; the moves listed below are more specific to wrestling itself. Many of the moves below can also be performed from a raised platform (the top rope, the ring apron, etc.); these are called aerial variations. Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Note that many of these moves are prohibited in Greco-Roman and Collegiate wrestling (because they are striking maneuvers as opposed to purely grappling maneuvers). Template:Expand list

Back elbowEdit

Also known as a Reverse Elbow, in this attack, the wrestler stands with his back to a running opponent and thrusts out an elbow, into which the opponent runs.

Bell clapEdit

The attacking wrestler slaps both ears of an opponent simultaneously with the palms of his hands, distorting their balance.[9] It is often used to escape a bearhug hold.[9] Big Van Vader frequently uses this move as a counter to charging opponents, as well as combining it with a running avalanche in the corner, where it is referred to as a Vader Splash.[9]

Body pressEdit

Template:For Also known as a splash or body block, a body press involves an wrestler falling against the opponent with the core of their body. It is executed from a running or jumping position, using momentum and weight to impact the opponent, and most variations can seamlessly transition into a pin. This attack is a plancha in lucha libre.

Back pressEdit

This press is executed while facing away from a standing opponent. Against a fallen opponent, this is a senton.

Big splashEdit

The big splash involves a wrestler jumping forward and landing stomach-first across an opponent lying on the ground below. This move was a trademark of Haystack Calhoun and has been a mainstay in the movesets of heavier/larger wrestlers.

Body avalancheEdit

The wrestler charges into an opponent in the corner of the ring without leaving their feet, crushing them into the turnbuckle. This is normally used by bigger, heavier wrestlers.

CrossbodyEdit

Also known as crossbody block, this is a maneuver in which a wrestler jumps onto his opponent and lands horizontally across the opponent's torso, forcing them to the mat and usually resulting in a pinfall attempt. There is also an aerial variation, known as a flying crossbody, where wrestler leaps from an elevated position towards the opponent.

Stinger splashEdit

This is an attack in which a wrestler runs at an opponent, who is upright in the corner, then jumps forward so that he splashes his whole body stomach-first, squashing his opponent between him and the turnbuckle. This move was named after its most notable user, Sting.

Lou Thesz pressEdit

This move, popularized and subsequently named after Lou Thesz, sees the attacking wrestler jump towards a standing opponent and knock him over, resulting in the opponent lying on his back with the attacking wrestler sitting on the opponent's chest, pinning him in a body scissors.[9]

A variation involves the attacking wrestler jumping on a running opponent, then repeatedly striking the opponent in the face while in the mounted position. This variation was first made popular by Stone Cold Steve Austin.

Vertical pressEdit

A vertical splash is a jumping attack made against a standing opponent, landing against the opponent's upper body while remaining upright, and bringing them down to the mat into a vertical splash (seated senton) position.

Bronco busterEdit

In the Bronco buster, an opponent is seated in the corner of the ring while the attacking wrestler jumps in the corner, straddling his or her opponent's body, and bounces up and down on the opponent's chest.[10] Goldust added pelvic thrusts to his version of the Bronco buster. The Bronco buster is normally treated as having comic or sexual connotations rather than as a legitimately painful move, the latter particularly true during some matches between female wrestlers.

ChopsEdit

Backhand chopEdit

File:HBK-and-Flair-backhand-chops.jpg

The act of a wrestler to slap the chest of his opponent with the palm of the hand using a backhand swing.[9] Many wrestlers use this chop, often referring to it as a knife edge chop, but it is best known for being used by Ric Flair. Flair's use has made it a tradition for fans to yell his signature "Wooo!" whenever any wrestler uses it.

Forehand chopEdit

Sometimes referred to as a frying pan chop or an openhand chop. The act of slapping the chest of the opponent using the forehand.[9]

Kesagiri chopEdit

A downward diagonal backhand chop to the side of the opponents neck.

Mongolian chopEdit

The act of 'karate chopping' both the opponent's shoulders and sides of the neck with the hands' edges in a swinging motion at the same time.

Overhead chopEdit

Also known as a brain chop or tomahawk chop, this move was made famous by the legendary Giant Baba. The wrestler draws his hand back and hits the opponent vertically with a backhand chop, usually hitting the head.

ClotheslineEdit

File:Benjamin-clotheslines-Cade,-RLA-Melb-10.11.2007.jpg

A move in which one wrestler runs towards another and extends his/her arm out from the side of the body and parallel to the ground, knocking over the other as he/she runs by.[9] This move is often confused with a lariat.[11]

Cactus clotheslineEdit

A clothesline used by Mick Foley that is named after his "Cactus Jack" gimmick.[12] The attacking wrestler charges at an opponent who is against the ring ropes and clotheslines him/her, and the force and momentum from the charge knocks both the wrestler and the opponent over the top rope and onto the floor.[13]

Clothesline from HellEdit

A clothesline used by JBL, named while he was working as one half of The Acolytes. The attacking wrestler gets a running start (usually off the ropes) first before hitting a high-impact clothesline, in which he swings his arm forward while running toward his opponent.

Corner clotheslineEdit

A clothesline used by a wrestler where instead of knocking a standing opponent, the wrestler charges against an opponent on the corner.

Flying clotheslineEdit

While running towards an opponent, an attacking wrestler leaps up into the air, before connecting with a clothesline. Another version sees an attacking wrestler leap up into the air and connecting with a clothesline onto an opponent leaning against the corner turnbuckle.

Short-arm clotheslineEdit

Also known as a short clothesline or short-range clothesline, this variation is set up by Irish-whipping the opponent, but holding onto the arm. When the held arm is completely extended, the wrestler pulls the opponent back and clotheslines him with the other arm.[9] Alternatively, this move can be performed in the same fashion, but following an Arm wrench or Wrist lock instead of an Irish whip, or by simply grabbing hold of one of the opponent's arms with one the wrestler's hands, pulling it towards the wrestler and clotheslining him with his spare arm.

Three-point stance clotheslineEdit

Also known as charging clothesline. In this move, a wrestler uses three-point stance and then clotheslines his opponent. This move was invented and popularized by "Hacksaw" Jim Duggan.

Double axe handleEdit

Template:Main Also known as a Double Sledge, Double Axe Handl, or Polish Hammer, this attack sees the wrestler clutch both hands together and swing them at an opponent, hitting any part of them. The Polish Hammer name comes from its most noted user, Ivan Putski. The other names come from the attack mimicking the motion seen when people swing a sledgehammer or axe. There is also a top rope variation.

DropsEdit

Drops are moves in which wrestlers jump or fall down onto a person on the floor, landing with a specific part of the body

Butt dropEdit

Template:See

Chop dropEdit

The wrestler either falls forward, or jumps up and drops down, hitting a lying opponent with a backhand chop on the way down. The wrestler usually lands on his knees.

Scotty 2 Hotty's Worm is a chop drop preceded by a routine that involves Scotty hopping on one leg four times (as the crowd chants W-O-R-M), doing worm dance moves towards the opponent and swinging his arms just before hitting the chop drop, while his opponent lies motionless on the mat.

Elbow dropEdit

An elbow drop is a move in which a wrestler jumps or falls down on an opponent driving his or her elbow into anywhere on the opponent's body.[9] A common elbow drop sees a wrestler raise one elbow before falling to one side and striking it across an opponent. Another common elbow drop is the pointed elbow drop that sees a wrestler raise both elbows up and drop directly forward dropping one, or both elbows onto the opponent.

The Rock's People's Elbow, involves the user dropping his opponent supine in the middle of the ring (usually with a scoop slam or a spinebuster), pulling off his elbow pad and throwing it into the audience, bouncing twice off the ring ropes to gain acceleration, getting near his opponent again, performing a feint leg drop and hitting an elbow drop to the opponent's chest.

Abdullah the Butcher used an elbow drop with the point of the elbow striking the opponent in the throat as his "Sudanese Meat Cleaver" finisher.

Bionic elbowEdit

This is a move in which a wrestler faces an opponent and smashes his elbow on to the top of the opponents head, made famous by Dusty Rhodes who precedes the move by 3 or 4 punches then spins his arms, grabs his crotch then hits his opponent with the elbow.

Spinning headlock elbow dropEdit

This is any elbow drop which is performed after applying a headlock, the most widely known variation is an inverted facelock elbow drop in which a wrestler puts his opponent into a inverted facelock, and then turns 180°, dropping the elbow across the opponent's chest, driving him down to the mat. Another variation of this move, popularized by Gregory Helms, sees the executer use their whole arm as a lariat instead of just the elbow.

Fist dropEdit

File:John Cena Five Knuckle Shuffle.jpg

A fist drop is a move in which a wrestler jumps/falls down on an opponent driving his fist into anywhere on the opponent's body.[9] The falling variation was commonly used by 'The Million Dollar Man' Ted DiBiase, who hit a downed opponent with multiple fist drops. John Cena uses a fist drop he calls the "Five Knuckle Shuffle," where he adds theatrics to the move, including waving his hand in front of his face in his "you can't see me" taunt, bouncing against the ropes then dusting off his shoulder, sometimes inserting theatrics (sometimes fixing the collar of the referee's shirt or dusting the referee's shoulder) before hitting the Fist Drop.

Forearm dropEdit

A forearm drop is a move in which a wrestler jumps down on an opponent driving his forearm into anywhere on the opponent's body.

Headbutt dropEdit

A headbutt drop is a move in which a wrestler jumps/falls down on an opponent driving his head into anywhere on the opponent's body.[9]

Knee dropEdit

A knee drop is a move in which a wrestler jumps/falls down on an opponent driving his knee into anywhere on the opponent's body.[9] It is often sold as more powerful if the wrestler bounces off the ropes first.

Knee drop bulldogEdit

A version of a knee drop that involves the wrestler placing one knee against the base of the opponent's neck, who is leaning forward, then dropping. This forces the opponent's head down to the mat, while landing on the opponent's upper body, and driving his knee to the neck of the opponent. There is also a diving version.

Leg dropEdit

Template:Main A move in which a wrestler will jump/fall and land the back of his leg across an opponent's chest, throat, or face.[9] Most famously used by Hulk Hogan, who uses this as his finisher when wrestling in North America, calling it the "Atomic Leg Drop."

Elbow smashEdit

The wrestler makes a punching motion, but tucks his or her hand towards the chest so the elbow and forearm make contact.[9] These can be used in place of punches because striking with a clenched fist is illegal in most wrestling matches.

FacewashEdit

With an opponent sitting against the bottom corner turnbuckle, an attacking wrestler repeatedly rubs the sole of their boot across the face of the opponent. This is usually followed by either a running front kick, a running knee, a running low yakuza kick, a low jumping single leg running front dropkick or other strikes that first see the attacking wrestler rebound off the opposing ropes and charge at the opponent.

The facewash name is closely associated with Samoa Joe, who popularized the move in American wrestling, and with Shinjiro Otani & Koji Kanemoto, who originally popularized the move in Japan.

Forearm clubEdit

An attacking wrestler uses one hand to take hold of an opponent (by their head or hair) and lean them forward while extending his or her other arm in a raised position and clenching the fist of that hand before throwing the arm forward down onto the opponent; using his or her forearm and clenched fist to club the opponent across the back of his or her head/neck. This will often send the opponent to the mat front-first.

A lesser used version of this move can see the attacking wrestler take hold of an opponent and lean him or her backwards to expose his or her chest area, allowing the attacking wrestler to club the chest of the opponent and send him or her to the mat back-first.

Forearm smashEdit

An attacking wrestler charges at the opponent with their arms out folded over each other, and then hit the opponent in the chest to force them back and down to the mat.[9] Sometimes, however, it hits the opponent's chin or face.

Flying forearm smashEdit

While running towards an opponent (usually after bouncing off the ropes), an attacking wrestler would leap up into the air, before connecting with a forearm smash.

Sliding forearm smashEdit

With the opponent seated on the mat, the attacking wrestler does a slide across the mat, before connecting with a forearm smash. This was innovated and used by Masato Tanaka.

HeadbuttEdit

An attack where a wrestler uses his head to strike a part of the opponent's body, usually the head or skull, to daze him.[9] Unlike a legitimate headbutt, the pro-wrestling version most often impacts with the opponent's forehead, counting on the superior hardness of the wrestler's head and the momentum delivered to hurt the opponent without hurting the wrestler. The headbutt is most often used by Samoan and Tongan wrestlers, who are generally portrayed in pro wrestling as having hard heads. However, very large wrestlers, such as André the Giant, have also used headbutts, counting on their sheer size to easily subdue their opponents.

Battering ramEdit

The wrestler stands facing an upright opponent, lowers their head and then jumps or charges forwards, driving the top of their head into the abdomen of the opponent. This move was made famous by Harley Race. There is also a double-team version of the move.

Trapping headbuttsEdit

The wrestler holds both the opponent's arms under his own, and delivers a series of headbutts to his opponent, who is unable to counter. This attack was popularized in the United States by Al Snow, whose fans would chant "Head" as he performed the maneuver.

Knee strikesEdit

Attacks where a wrestler will strike an opponent using their knees. The idea of using knees as an offensive weapon is popular through out British wrestling.

Go 2 SleepEdit

Also known as go 2 sleep or G.T.S. (Go To Sleep), this move, named and innovated by KENTA, sees a wrestler place an opponent in a fireman's carry and proceed to drop the opponent in front of them. While the opponent is falling, the wrestler quickly lifts a knee up, striking the opponent in the face. KENTA also uses an inverted variation in which he lifts his opponent into an Argentine backbreaker rack, throws his opponent forward, and strikes the back of the opponent's head with his knee.

The move is best known in the US for being C.M. Punk's finishing move.

Davey Richards uses a modified version named Go 2 Sleep 2.0 in which he lifts his opponent into a military press, drops the opponent in front of him, and lifts his leg up as the opponent is falling, delivering a stiff kick to the opponent's face.

Shining WizardEdit

A strike delivered to an opponent down on one knee. After stepping off the opponent's raised knee with one foot, the wrestler swings his other leg and strikes the opponent's head with either the side of his knee or his shin. The move was innovated and named by Keiji Mutoh, who originally performed the move as a high knee to the forehead of the opponent.

An inverted variation known as the Glimmering Warlock was innovated by Arik Cannon and is performed to an opponent down on one knee after stepping off of one of the opponent's calves from behind with the wrestler swinging his other leg and striking the back of his opponent's head with an enzuigiri.

High kneeEdit

An attack in which a wrestler will charge towards their opponent, then raise their knee or jump up so that their knee hit the opponent usually into the side of the head or face.[9] This move has been closely associated with Harley Race, often being referred to as a "Harley Race-style High Knee".

KENTA uses a dropkick-like variation named the Busaiku Knee Kick where he charges towards the opponent and jumps up from his left foot, throwing his right leg and arms forward while bending his left knee, striking the opponent in the head and/or upper chest region.

Hip attackEdit

Also known as a Butt bump /Butt thump, this attack is usually performed with a running start, when wrestler jumps into the air, spins around, and thrusts his pelvis backwards, thus hitting the opponent's head or chest with his hip or buttocks.[9] The move is also known as the Butt Butt and was made famous by Iceman Parsons in World Class Championship Wrestling in the 80s as well as the tag team The Killer Bees, who called it the Bee Stinger.

KickEdit

A kick is an attack using the foot, knee or leg to strike any part of the opponent's body.

Backflip kickEdit

While the wrestler has his or her back to the opponent, he or she performs a standing backflip and hits the opponent in the head with one or both his or her legs, with the wrestler usually landing on his or her hands and/or feet facing downward.[9] This maneuver is known for its use chiefly by Puroresu Legend Keiji Mutoh and, more recently, A.J. Styles who calls it the Pelé kick after the famed Brazilian footballer who popularised the bicycle kick in football.

Corner backflip kickEdit

This move sees an opponent propped up in the corner as an attacking wrestler charges towards him or her, running up the ropes (that are beside the opponent), or in some cases, up the opponent, and, as he or she reaches the top, kicking off this opponent's chest to perform a backflip so the wrestler lands on his/her feet.[9]

Big bootEdit

This is usually done with the opponent charging towards the wrestler, using the opponent's momentum to deliver the wrestler's boot to the upper-body or head.[9] This move is commonly performed by tall wrestlers to enhance its view as a strong attack even though the wrestler themselves are not moving and the opponent is running into their foot, and due to that their height makes it easy for their leg to reach the head of normal sized wrestlers.

When this move is performed with the wrestler charging towards an opponent it is referred to as a Yakuza Kick, named by Masahiro Chono. Taking the naming convention in reference to the organized crime groups, the move is also referred to as a Mafia Kick in the United States, and Hooligan Kick in the United Kingdom.

Bicycle kickEdit

An attacking wrestler jumps up and kicks forward with both feet in a pedaling motion with the foot that gets lifted second being extended fully to catch a charging opponent directly in the face.

Dragon whipEdit

This is a leg lariat or Spinning heel-kick move which is performed after an opponent catches the leg of a wrestler who has attempted a kick of some sort (i.e. superkick or side kick), then while the opponent throws the leg out away from himself the wrestler continues to spin all the way out with his leg still extended to hit the leg lariat.

DropkickEdit

A dropkick is defined as an attack where the wrestler jumps up and kicks the opponent with the soles of both feet, this sees the wrestler twist as they jump so that when the feet connect with the opponent one foot is raised higher that the other (depending on which way they twist) and the wrestler fall back to the mat on their side, or front.[9] This is commonly employed by light and nimble wrestlers who can take advantage of their agility.

EnzuigiriEdit

Template:Image stack Enzuigiri was one of the signature moves by Antonio Inoki. The term Enzui is the Japanese word for medulla oblongata and giri means "to chop". Thus, an enzuigiri (often misspelled 'ensuigiri' or 'enzuiguri') is any attack that strikes the back of the head. It is usually associated with lighter weight class wrestlers, as well as wrestlers who have a martial arts background or gimmick. It is often a counter-move after a kick is blocked and the leg caught, or the initial kick is a feint to set up the real enzuigiri attack.

"Gentleman" Chris Adams' enzuigiri was often mistakenly called a superkick before bringing the real maneuver itself to the U.S. from his stint in Japan. In America, this maneuver was made famous by Bad News Brown, who used a running variation simply known as a running enzuigiri in which he calls it the Ghetto Blaster.

Football kickEdit

Sometimes also referred to as a soccer kick. The wrestler kicks an opponent, who is sitting on the mat, vertically to their back, with the foot striking the base of the spine, and the shin striking the back of the head.

Jumping high kickEdit

The wrestler jumps up and kicks the opponent to the side of their head. It is properly called a Gamengiri, but due to the similar nature can be confused for an enzuigiri.

Kick to the midsection of a rope-hung opponentEdit

File:Holly-kick-on-Kennedy,-RLA-Melb-10.11.2007.jpg

The wrestler positions the opponent facing the ropes, grabs both ankles lifting the lower half of the body, with the upper body now hanging over the ropes, and delivers a firm kick between the legs to the lower abdominal region of the opponent. Commonly used by Hardcore Holly.

LegsweepEdit

The wrestler drops to one knee and extends their other leg, then quickly pivots their body around, using their extended leg to knock away the opponent’s legs.[9]

Mule kickEdit

While facing away from a charging opponent, the wrestler bends down and pushes out one foot, striking the opponent with the bottom of it.[9]

Double mule kickEdit

Usually done with the wrestler facing away from the opponent, sometimes done in a corner. The wrestler jumps and kicks backwards with both legs to the opponent, hitting them with both soles of their feet. If acrobatically inclined, the wrestler can then roll forward into a standing position.

Overhead kickEdit

Similar to a backflip kick, this attack sees the wrestler either start by lying down or drops down on the mat while the opponent standing near their head.[9] The wrestler lifts a leg and kicks up over their waist and chest, hitting the opponent with the top of their foot, usually in the head.[9] Can be used as a counter to an attack from behind.[9] For example, a wrestler attempts a full nelson, the wrestler breaks the opponent’s lock, falls to the canvas and kicks them in the face with their foot.[9]

PuntEdit

Based on the punt kick used in American football, this sees the wrestler take a run up to a kneeing opponent and strike the opponent in the head with the his foot. WWE superstar Randy Orton popularised the move.

Rolling wheel kickEdit

It is also known as a Abisegiri, Rolling Koppou kick or Spinning Wheel Kick. The wrestler rolls towards a standing opponent, extending a leg which connects with the back, chest, or head of the opponent.[9]

Savate kickEdit

The most commonly used kick which is referred to as a "Savate kick" in wrestling is the chassé, a piston-action kick, with the sole of the foot to an opponent's head or chin. This kick is in some ways similar to, but not considered, a superkick.

Scissors kickEdit

Template:Main A version of a leg drop, which is performed on an opponent who is standing, bent over, usually in the middle of the ring.[9] This sees a wrestler bounces off the ropes, jumps -- driving his leg(s) into the back of the head and the neck of the opponent, forcing them face first into the floor.[9] Also known as a Jumping Axe Kick, or a Butterfly Kick. In the West, this move is usually associated with Booker T.

Shoot kickEdit

A kickboxing-style kick with the shin (generally protected by a shin guard) striking an opponent's face or chest. This move originated in the Japanese UWF and is used in shoot-style environments and by many Japanese wrestlers, most notably Toshiaki Kawada, whose usage of this kick resulted in it being called the Kawada Kick on some occasions.

Sole kickEdit

A thrust kick where the wrestler turns his torso away from the opponent while at the same time lifting his leg horizontally and extending it forward, striking the opponent in the torso with the sole of his foot. Tiger Mask and Ultimo Dragon use it as a part of their kick combination, which consists of a shoot kick and a spin kick, followed by the jumping rolling sole butt kick.

A spin kick variation sees the wrestler spin around and then perform the sole butt kick with his outer leg, which is known as a Rolling sole kick in Japan. There is also jumping variation where the wrestler jumps straight up, spins in the air, and then delivers the sole butt with his outer leg targeting the head of the opponent.

Spin kickEdit

A high kick which gains power and momentum from spinning in place.[9] Similar to the spinning heel kick or a reverse roundhouse kick, but the wrestler does not jump off the ground, making the move a leg lariat of sorts.[9] It is common to see this move executed after an opponent is irish whipped off the ropes. In Mexico, it is known as La Filomena.

Spinning heel kickEdit

File:Holly-spinning-heel-kick-on-Kennedy,-RLA-Melb-10.11.2007.jpg

This move usually involves the wrestler spinning 360 degrees as they jump so that his or her body is somewhat horizontal, before hitting their opponent with back of his/her leg(s) or heel(s) on the face, neck or chest.[9]

StompEdit

Also known as a foot stomp, this attack sees a wrestler stamp his foot on any part of a fallen opponent.[9] One variation of the stomp called the Garvin Stomp, named after its innovator Ron Garvin, sees a wrestler perform a series of stomps all over the body of a fallen opponent in the order of left arm, left chest, left stomach, left upper leg, left lower leg, right lower leg, right upper leg, right stomach, right chest, right arm, and finally the jaw.

Double foot stompEdit

When a wrestler jumps and stamps both feet on any part of an opponent.[9] Also known as a double stomp.[9]

SuperkickEdit

Template:Main A high side thrust kick with the sole of the foot to an opponent's head or chin, usually preceded by a sidestep, often referred to as a Shuffle side kick, Crescent Kick, or just a Side kick. The wrestler will often slap their thigh to generate an appropriate sound effect. It is the equivalent of the Sokuto Geri or Yoko Geri used in Karate. A popular variation of the superkick is Shawn Michaels' Sweet Chin Music.

Tiger feint kickEdit

File:Rey-eddie.jpg

The Tiger Feint Kick, named after Tiger Mask, and innovated by Satoru Sayama, the original Tiger Mask, is a move in which a wrestler jumps through the second and top rope while holding on to the ropes, and uses the momentum to swing back around into the ring, and was originally performed as a fake dive to make opponents and fans think that the wrestler was about to dive through the ropes to opponents outside the ring. This move requires high agility, and is mainly used by smaller wrestlers in Japan and Mexico.

A variation of this move, innovated by the Japanese wrestler MIKAMI, who calls it the Mickey Boom, sees an opponent being hung over the second rope facing the outside, as MIKAMI swings around back to the ring his feet would hit the prone opponent in the head. In the western world, this version is best known as the 619 as named by Rey Mysterio in reference to the area code of San Diego, Mysterio's hometown.

LariatEdit

In wrestling, a lariat is when an attacking wrestler runs towards an opponent, wraps his arm around their upper chest and neck and then forces them to the ground. This move is similar to a clothesline,[14] the difference being that in a clothesline the wrestler's arm is kept straight to the side of the wrestler during the move, while in the lariat the wrestler strikes their opponent with his arm.

This move is a frequent finisher in Puroresu wrestling matches, as a homage to strong style wrestling legend Stan Hansen who used the lariat as his finisher. Barry Windham also used the Lariat as a finisher in his days with the Four Horseman alongside Arn Anderson, Ric Flair, and Sid Vicious.

A lariat to the back of the opponent's neck and shoulders is sometimes referred to as a northern lariat or enzui lariat. A lariat where the wrestler doesn't run but simply strikes the opponent while standing next to him is sometimes referred to as a short range lariat or a Burning Lariat. The wrestler can also hold the opponent's head up before performing the lariat with his other arm. A short-arm lariat is variation where the wrestler grabs one of the opponent's wrists with his hand and pulls the opponent closer, striking him with the lariat with his other arm.

Crooked arm lariatEdit

The crooked arm lariat is performed when an attacking wrestler runs towards an opponent with the his arm bent upward at the elbow 60-90 degrees and wraps his arm around their head forcing them to the ground. Hulk Hogan used this maneuver as a finisher while wrestling in Japan, and calls it the Axe Bomber. This move is famous in Japan because Hogan accidentally knocked out Antonio Inoki with it. Takao Omori is now the primary user of the move.

Flying lariatEdit

The attacking wrestler first uses the ropes to build up speed. When speed is built the attacking wrestler uses the speed to leap forward and wrap his/or her arm around the opponent's neck, causing the power of the force to knock down the opponent.

Lariat takedownEdit

The wrestler runs towards his opponent, wraps his arm around their upper chest and neck of the opponent, and swings his legs forward, using his momentum to pull the opponent down with him to the mat, on to their upper back. This move is also called a running neckbreaker, bulldog lariat or a (one-man) Hart Attack.

Leg lariatEdit

Also referred to as a jumping leg lariat or a running calf kick this attack is seen when an attacking wrestler runs towards an opponent, jumps and wraps his leg around the opponent's head / neck knocking the opponent to the ground.

Doug Basham and Slyk Wagner Brown are known for jumping higher than what is needed and wrapping his lowest leg around the opponent's head forcing the opponent and himself to the ground. Basham calls this variation the Last Impression. He would also land on the opponent in a fashion not so different from a leg drop.

PunchEdit

A simple close-fisted punch, normally to the body or face of the opponent.[9] Unlike most illegal attacks, punches almost never result in disqualification. Instead, the referee simply admonishes the wrestler to stop, usually to no effect. Punches are often used by both heels and faces. However, when heel wrestlers perform the strike while either the opponent is not expecting it, or when the referee is in some way distracted, it seems more devastating and often referred to as a "cheap shot".

Punches to the head are much less tolerated in Japan, although punches to the body are accepted. This also holds true for Ring of Honor's "Pure Wrestling" division.

Heart PunchEdit

This finisher was used briefly by The Undertaker during his days as 'Mean Mark' Callous, and has also been used by Big John Studd, Stan 'The Man' Stasiak, Barry Windham and his father Blackjack Mulligan. The wrestler raises the opponent's left arm up over their head, sometimes folding it back behind their neck as well, then delivers a strong punch into the side of the ribcage. The move is alleged to rely on "Oriental pressure points" to strike a nerve causing the opponent's heart to momentarily stop, rendering them unconscious.

The move is also associated with Ox Baker, whose use of the move was made infamous in being (falsely) linked to two wrestling deaths.Template:Fact

Mounted punchesEdit

A common variation of the punch involves standing on the middle or top ropes and delivering repeated punches to the face while the opponent is backed up against the turnbuckles. The crowd tends to count the punches, which typically end at ten, provided they're not interrupted by the opponent pushing the wrestler off the ropes. In some cases, with a prone opponent facing up or down, the wrestler can seat themselves on top and throw punches towards the head area in a similar manner.

Spinning back fistEdit

Often aimed at a standing opponent or one sat on the top turnbuckle. The wrestler holds their arm out with fist clenched and turns their body with speed so that the back of their fist strikes the opponent in the head or chest on rotation.

SlapEdit

The wrestler delivers an overpowering backhand / open-hand slap to his / her opponent.

Double slapEdit

The wrestler slaps both of the opponent's cheeks with his/her both hands.This sometimes can be referred to a Bell clap.

Palm strikeEdit

Known as a Shotei, this move sees the wrestler deliver an open hand strike with the palm of their hand, usually to the chin of the opponent.

SentonEdit

Similar to a big splash, except the wrestler jumps over an opponent while falling backwards to land back-first on the opponent.[9] Often referred to as a Senton Splash, or Back Splash in reference to the big splash as well as to differentiate from the senton's diving version.

Another slight variation on a standard senton sees the attacking wrestler jump forward and perform a somersault (front flip) to land back-first on the opponent. This is appropriately known as a Somersault Senton, but is also referred to as a Front flip senton / Rolling senton.

Standing corkscrew sentonEdit

This senton variation is performed by first executing a backflip, then spinning 180°, landing on a fallen opponent back-first.

Seated sentonEdit

A seated senton, also known as a vertical splash, is a maneuver in which a wrestler jumps down to a sitting position across the chest or stomach of a fallen opponent. This particular move is usually executed one of two ways: from a standing position over the opponent or from the middle rope with the opponent in the corner. Some larger wrestlers in the past have used the seated senton as a finisher, such as Yokozuna, who called it the Banzai drop.

The butt drop as it is sometimes known as is an obvious and often-used counter to the sunset flip.

CannonballEdit

This is a front flip senton performed to an opponent sitting in a corner. With the opponent seated the wrestler runs at the opponent and flips forward 180° so that their back impacts on the opponents chest and head causing the opponent to be sandwiched between the turnbuckle and the wrestler.

Shoulder blockEdit

A shoulder block sees a strike an opponent with their shoulder usually ramming their shoulder, by keeping their arm down by their side, into the opponent's shoulder or abdomen of an opponent running towards them. However, often this will see a larger wrestler stand still and have the other wrestler run towards the larger one to try an execute the move only to get knocked down.

The shoulder block often is used to display the size and strength of a wrestler, with the larger wrestler challenging another to run off the ropes and hit the move. This usually sees the other wrestler attempt to charge at the larger one several times only to see their attempts have no effect, or get knocked down themselves. A slight variation on this called the body block which is also typically used by large wrestlers, this sees an opponent run at the large wrestler who would simply engulf the charging opponent by swing his/her arms round and forcing the opponent to impact the wrestlers entire body.

Chop blockEdit

The chop block is a shoulder block that targets the back of an opponent's knee. The wrestler performing this attack would come from behind an opponent and drop down to connect with his/her shoulder into the back of one of the opponent's knees, this is often used to weaken the leg for submission holds. Ric Flair uses this move as a signature.

SpearEdit

File:Edge-spear-2007.jpg

Also known as a shoulder block takedown, this is an attack where an attacking wrestler charges towards a standing opponent, jumps and brings his body parallel to the ground, driving their shoulder into the opponent's mid-section, tackling them and forcing them down to the mat. This move will often see the wrestler also pull his opponent's legs, as in a double leg takedown.

Rhino uses a version he calls the Gore, in which he does not hold on to the opponent to tackle them, but instead uses the move as a high-impact striking maneuver.

Turnbuckle thrustEdit

This move is a shoulder block performed to an opponent who is set up on the turnbuckle. The opponent is often resting back first against the turnbuckles. The wrestler can run at the opponent, but normally the wrestler will place his/her shoulder against the opponent and swing their legs back and forth, driving their shoulder into the opponent’s chest, often repeatedly to then gain momentum.

Standing moonsaultEdit

Template:Main A move in which a wrestler, who is standing next to an opponent lying on the ground, turns his back to the opponent and executes a standing backflip, landing on the opponent chest-first.

Standing shooting star pressEdit

Template:Main

Stink FaceEdit

This move sees a wrestler rubbing his or her butt in the face of an opponent lying in the corner of the ring.[15] This is done to humiliate the opponent. This move was most commonly used by Rikishi and Torrie Wilson.

UppercutEdit

Template:Main The uppercut is a punch used in boxing that usually aims at the opponent's chin. It is, along with the hook, one of the two main punches that count in the statistics as power punches. In boxing an uppercut only refers to a punch, while in wrestling other forms of uppercuts are used including an open-handed punch version (see throat thrust below).

European uppercutEdit

This is a forearm uppercut in which a wrestler does a quick grapple then brings their arm up inside to hit the opponent under the chin. This move has long been a signature move of many European wrestlers and is often adopted by more technical wrestlers also.

Knee liftEdit

This is an uppercut using the wrestler's knee in which a wrestler brings their knee up to hit the opponent under the chin.[9] This often sees a prone opponent bent over when the wrestler chargers at the opponent and lifts his knee up under them.[9]

Double knee liftEdit

The wrestler forces the opponent’s head down, then quickly jumps, bending at the knees, and hits the opponent in the face or chest.[9]

Throat thrustEdit

Also known as a throat strike, sword stab, or an open-hand uppercut, this attack is similar to a conventional uppercut, but the wrestler strikes at the opponent's throat with an open hand usually with their palm facing upwards and with all five fingers together.[9]. This move can also be done with the opponent in a side headlock.[9]

WWE wrestler Umaga uses a highly unique variation of this move that called the Samoan Spike which sees him using just one thumb to strike the front or side of his opponent's neck at a high rate of speed.

Weapon shotEdit

File:Chairshot.jpg

Many items are used as weapons in professional wrestling. Some of the more common weapons used include chairs, guitars, folding tables, title belts, "kendo sticks", and trash cans.

While picking up the upper half of the ring steps for use as a weapon is illegal, slamming an opponent into the ring steps is not considered illegal, though it is frowned upon. However, these weapons are legal in hardcore matches.

Chair shotEdit

A wrestler simply hits the opponent with a chair. In modern wrestling Steel/metal folding chairs are used with the strike being performed with the flat face of the chair to slow the swing and distribute the impact, to prevent injury.

One man con-chair-toEdit

This chair attack involves a wrestler placing their opponent so that they are horizontal with their head resting on a chair, then hitting their head from above with a second chair, squashing the head of the opponent between both chairs.[16] This move was made popular by the former team Edge and Christian, who developed this move from its double team version.[16]

El KabongEdit

A maneuver used by Jeff Jarrett, The Honky Tonk Man, and New Jack in particular, it simply involves breaking a guitar over an opponent's head. Since the guitar is usually acoustic, it is often referred to as "The Acoustic Equalizer".

The "El Kabong" name comes from the name of the alter ego of cartoon character Quick Draw McGraw, known for doing the same. The reference to the cartoon was first popularized by ECW play-by-play man Joey Styles.

Transition movesEdit

Some moves are meant neither to pin an opponent, nor weaken them or force them to submit, but are intended to set up the opponent for another attack.

DiscusEdit

This is a move in which a wrestler will spin in place before hitting an attack, like the discus clothesline, discus punch, or the discus forearm. The move is usually used instead of charging towards an opponent to build up momentum for an attack.

HandspringEdit

The wrestler runs towards the ropes and performs a handstand right next to them, using his momentum to throw his legs against the ropes, using the spring to throw himself backwards back onto his feet, and using the momentum still to leap backwards, usually to deliver an attack. A back elbow strike variation is the most common.

Another common variation of the handspring transition sees the attacking wrestler Irish-whip their opponent onto a turnbuckle from an adjacent corner. Once the opponent crashes with their back onto the turnbuckle, the wrestler immediately performs a handspring combo towards the opponent across the ring. The acrobatic combination usually consists of a cartwheel followed by one or two back-tucks leaving the wrestler's back facing the opponent. When the wrestler is in close range of the opponent, they are free to use the momentum of the handspring combination to leap backwards and strike with either a back-elbow, a back-thump, a dropkick or any other convenient attack. This attack is most often used by female wrestlers with gymnastic experience such as Chyna, Molly Holly, Jillian Hall and Sharmell Sullivan, with Sharmell using a back-elbow strike and calling her variation the Sharmellbow.

Rolling ThunderEdit

File:Rollingthunder.jpg

A rolling thunder refers to the action of a forward roll towards an opponent using the complete rotation to spring up onto their feet and into the air and perform an attack. The most popular version of this ends it with a jumping somersault senton and is used by Rob Van Dam. Originally it was a tag team maneuver with Van Dam doing a jumping somersault senton while Sabu would do a Springboard somersault legdrop, both hitting the opponent at the same time.

Though Van Dam doesn't call his move anything more than "Rolling Thunder" most other variations use a naming system of Rolling Thunder [attack name]. The most notable variations are ones ending in a vertical splash ("Rolling Thunder Splash" also used by Van Dam), a jumping lariat ("Rolling Thunder Lariat" as used by Konnan), a European Uppercut and a legdrop version.

Illegal attacksEdit

Illegal attacks are mainly used by heel wrestlers and are usually an offense punishable by disqualification, though typically done when the referee is disabled or otherwise distracted. The most well-known illegal moves are ones that attack the groin of a male wrestler.

Asian mistEdit

Template:Main The wrestler spits a colored mist (typically green, but also in red and black varieties) into the face of the opponent, supposedly stinging and temporarily blinding them. As the name implies, the move is associated with wrestlers of Asian origin. Asian mist was invented by The Great Kabuki and Yoshihiro Tajiri uses this move.

BitingEdit

The wrestler seizes a body part of the opponent and bites down with their teeth. Biting is often used when a wrestler is "trapped", either in a corner of the ring or in a submission hold, as a desperation move.

Eye pokeEdit

When a wrestler pokes his finger(s) into an opponent's eye(s). This is an illegal attack mainly used by heel wrestlers to gain an upper hand on their opponent.

Eye rakeEdit

Also called a Thumb to the eye. This is when a wrestler rakes his thumb(s) down an opponent's eye(s).[9] This is an illegal attack mainly used by heel wrestlers to gain an upperhand on their opponent.

FireballEdit

The wrestler (using a concealed lighter) sets a piece of quick-burning paper (flash paper) and throws it at the opponent's face, giving the impression of a supernatural ball of fire emerging from their hand. The Sheik is credited as the first man to throw fire in wrestling.

HangmanEdit

Seen when a wrestler who is on the opposite side of the ring ropes from an opponent (on the 'apron') grabs him by the head and drops down, forcing the opponent’s throat across the ropes. This is an illegal attack because of its use of the rope. Also known as a "Hot Shot".

Hair PullEdit

Simple yet dirty move, that sees one wrestler take advantage of another's long hair by pulling it. In modern mainstream wrestling, it is more commonly used by female heel wrestlers. Similarly to a submission hold in the ropes, or a choke, the wrestler is given a five count to stop, before being Disqualified.

Low blowEdit

A direct shot to the groin of an opponent;[9] otherwise known as a groin attack or referred to in slang terms as an Irish Curse. It is an offense punishable by disqualification. This illegal attack is mainly used by heel wrestlers or valets to gain the upper hand on their male opponents. Although kicking an opponent in the groin is the most obvious method, the most popular version sees an attacking wrestler drop to their knees and raise their arm up between the opponent's legs, striking the groin with the inside of their elbow-joint. Often wrestlers will perform the strike while the referee is in some way distracted in what is known as a "cheap shot".

Despite hitting the groin, the inverted atomic drop known also as Manhattan Drop is not considered a low blow. This is because it involves dropping the opponent so that their groin hits the wrestler's knee, rather than raising a knee to hit the opponent's groin. In the same fashion, if a wrestler is lifted so that they fall and straddle an object it is frowned upon but not deemed illegal. Another non-illegal method is to take the feet away from under an opponent while they are standing on the top rope so they drop and straddle the rope/corner turnbuckle.

Testicular clawEdit

A version of a clawhold in which a wrestler will grab hold of an opponent by the testicles and squeeze. This is an illegal attack mainly used by wrestlers to gain the upper hand on their opponents and is an offense punishable by disqualification. Ric Flair has popularized the use of this move.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

Template:Reflist

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

fr:Attaques au catch pt:Ataques de wrestling profissional ro:Tehnici de atac în wrestling


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